LECTURES & PRESENTATIONS

2011 EMP Pop Conference: UCLA
Presented "Militant Motown: The Lost Black Forum Recordings"

“This isn’t about the stuff you already know, like Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On or the Temptations’ “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” but actual Black Power leaders delivering the speeches collected on the small handful of titles from the Motown-distributed Black Forum label.”
 flavorwire.com


Bumbershoot Arts & Literary Festival 2010: Seattle, WA
Presented "Listen Whitey: The Sounds of Black Power"

“Music historian Pat Thomas was schooling folks about the music of the Black Power movement. Thomas dug deep into his record collection to present a series of tracks that detailed the social plight and political struggles of African-Americans in the ’60s and ’70s. If the subject matter was familiar to those aware of that strife-laden, combustible time in American history, the music mostly was not. ”
 Dave Segal, The Stranger


Spring Semester 2010: Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA
Presented two hour lecture on music of the Black Power Movement to a class called "Popular Music and Literature in the 1960s"

“Supported by ample and appropriate visual aids and delivered with the clarity and confidence that comes with years of teaching, Pat's lecture was enthusiastically received by his peers and faculty. It was one of the highlights of the Spring Quarter.”
 Chico Herbison, Ph.D


Summer Semester 2007: Merritt College, Oakland
Presented three different lectures over the course of the semester for a Music Appreciation Class:
  • 1960’s/1970’s African-American Social Protest recordings
  • The influence of the “Minimalists” (Terry Riley, Lamonte Young, Tony Conrad, et al)
  • The links between popular and experimental music (Velvet Underground, Tom Verlaine/Television, U2, et al)

“Pat has an encyclopedic knowledge of several specialized areas of American vernacular music”
  Larry London, Music Professor


Fall Semester 2007: Laney College, Oakland
Presented a 1960's/1970's African-American Social Protest recordings lecture to an African American History class.

“Pat ended the course with a moving educational presentation about protest music produced by Motown in the height of the Black Panther era”
 Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, Political Science Professor


March 2008: San Francisco State University
Participated in a panel with Black Panther Chairman Elaine Brown and three female African-American political-science SFSU professors for an African American Woman's History Month conference. Presented 1960's/1970's African-American Social Protest recordings to the 300 attendees.

“In three hours of fierce debate, rigorous and thoughtful presentations, Elaine Brown and Pat Thomas inspired numerous attendees to think”
 Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, Political Science Professor


Spring Semester 2008: Merritt College, Oakland
Presented a 1960's/1970's African-American Social Protest recordings lecture to a Cultural Anthropology class.

“Pat’s lecture was not only informative, it was exceptional”
 Barbara Joans, Anthropology Professor


Summer Semester 2008: Merritt College, Oakland
Presented five different lectures over the course of the semester for a Music Appreciation Class:
  • 1960's/1970's African-American Social Protest recordings
  • 1960's-1980's female singer-songwriters
  • Psychedelic music of the 1960's
  • Classic rock (Beatles, Rolling Stones, The Who, David Bowie, et al)
  • Folk-Rock (Bob Dylan, Fairport Convention, Richard & Linda Thompson, Joan Baez, et al)

“He is an enthusiastic speaker and is able to set the music of a particular period within a sociological-historical context”
 Larry London, Music Professor


Spring Semester 2009: College of Alameda
Over the course of the semester, presented a series of lectures to a 20th Century American Protest Movement History Class
  • 1960's/1970's African American Social Protest Music
  • The history of the Black Panther Party and SNCC
  • The Yippie's; Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin
  • The music of the 1969 Woodstock Festival

“He was able to cover the complexity of the Black Power movement, while making the information accessible to students with a very limited knowledge of the subject”
 Mustafa Popal, History Professor